Bimota DB6 Delirio - Right Side

Ending Soon – 2006 Bimota DB6 Delirio

I’m sorry I wasn’t able to find this bike sooner – regular readers who wait for the email won’t see this bike until after the listing has expired, but I doubt it will sell and I’m sure you can always contact the seller directly. Here we’ve got a Bimota DB6 Delirio (what a great name), a naked standard that was part of Bimota’s re-birth after being purchased by Roberto Comini in 2003. Continue reading

BMW R100 Vintage Cafe Racer - Front Left

1980 BMW R100 Vintage Cafe Racer

Is it weird that I’m featuring a bike solely because of the fairing? Well, we’re already familiar with the R100, but this bike looks great in Ivory White with black pinstripes, Supertrapp exhaust, and a custom fairing with Zero Gravity windscreen that bolts onto the stock fram without modification. I’d probably replace the model name on the engine with a stock piece, and alter the seat a bit, but then I’d just add more miles to the 9,000 on the odometer. Continue reading

Bimota SB8K Santa Monica - Right Side

Brand New – 2006 Bimota SB8K Santa Monica

I’ve had a weird run of “Brand New” bikes – motorcycles that haven’t been titled or ridden yet. After the Harley-Davidson MX250 and the Ducati 900S2, today we’ve got a Bimota SB8K Santa Monica with 0 miles on the odometer.

Bimota SB8K Santa Monica - Cockpit

With a terrifying MSRP of $45,900 back when it was new, this was a bike for only the well-heeled. $15k less would get you a 999R! The engine was a V-Twin from the Suzuki TL1000R, and it produces over 140 pounds in a bike that weighs less than 400 pounds. As you’d expect with that MSRP, you also got features like a Ohlins 43mm fork and radially mounted Brembos. For a little more information about the Santa Monica, check out this “First Ride” from Motorcyclist.

Bimota SB8K Santa Monica - Right Rear

This specific Bimota SB8K Santa Monica is #8, has 0 miles, and has just sat as a collector’s item since new. Even though the bike has never been used, the seller has added an insane amount of upgrades – $3,600 Bimota carbon fiber gas tank, gas cap, and tank guards, $1,000 Bimota billet control levers, $1,250 Moto Corse billet turn signal units (are you kidding me?!)…the list goes on with similarly priced items. If I included the full list of items, this would probably become the longest post I’ve ever written. There’s a lot of money in this bike, though everyone knows that the value of additions is almost completely wiped out in a resale situation. The seller seems to be putting it up on eBay to gauge interest more than anything else, but who knows? Someone might want to snap it up right now.

Bimota SB8K Santa Monica - Right Side

Find this Bimota SB8K Santa Monica for sale in Englewood, Colorado with a BIN of $36,000 or best offer

To the Top of Alaska, Day 9 - Featured

To the Top of Alaska, Day 9

Day 9 – June 12th, 2014 – Juneau, AK – 0 road miles

Again, I have to stress something that I didn’t know until I started planning this trip: there’s no road out of Juneau. It blows my mind that the capital of a state can only be accessed by sea or by air, but I guess it’s part of the charm?

We were supposed to head out to Haines via the ferry this morning, but as mentioned previously, our boat out had been cancelled. What to do with an extra free day in Alaska’s capital?

First thing – you sleep in! We all got a chance to rest after yesterday’s long hike, and then we eventually got to The Hangar on the Wharf, a former floatplane hangar that now offers a great view while you’re eating. Clam chowder? Good. Beers from Alaskan Brewing? Better. Enjoying both while watching floatplanes land and dock right in front of you? I was a happy boy.
Bike-urious Alaska

Some more seaplanes came in to join us. Turns out a tour company runs a fleet of 5 planes that will take you out to an island, enjoy a salmon bake, and come back.
Bike-urious Alaska

While I enjoyed another beer, I filmed all 5 of the fleet taking off:

We decided to explore ‘downtown’ Juneau, which is basically two streets of restaurants and shops, all of which await the constant stream of cruise ship passengers. One of our stops was the Red Dog Saloon, which is the oldest man-made tourist attraction in Juneau.
Bike-urious Alaska

It’s an over-priced tourist trap (and I remember hearing that it’s actually a replica of the original which burnt down, but I can’t verify that at the moment), and it’s full of fun like this:
Bike-urious Alaska

On our way back to the bikes, I saw a sign that gave some more details about the fleet of planes we saw at lunch. They have a few options, and they fly the nifty de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otters that you saw above.
Bike-urious Alaska

Also in town, the “JnuJeep”, presumably a vehicle used at an airbnb or similar type place. I was just surprised that they’d leave an easily visible note saying where you could find a spare key. Somehow I don’t think that would fly in a big city.
Bike-urious Alaska

Another important thing on a free day – brewery visits. Bui and Vy were kind enough to humor me for a visit to Alaskan Brewing.
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We enjoyed their tasting area…
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…which was just in the corner of their lobby. See all the bottles up top?
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They’re organized by country of origin, though US beers are split up into states.
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Our timing was quite fortunate, as they were about to start a guided tasting of the following.
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We had a very entertaining lady give us both the history of Alaskan Brewing, as well as tastes of beer.
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Yum.
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Happy customers.
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I was also a happy customer. I enjoyed the Smoked Porter so much that Vy bought a couple of bottles for me, with the intent of bringing them all the way back to Los Angeles. Whether or not I could resist cracking them open beforehand, and how the hell I was going to find room for them were questions for ‘future Abhi’ to deal with. We also bought a bottle of Icy Bay IPA as a thank you for Paul, the residency coordinator at University of Alaska Southeast that got us set up with rooms. I might not have been riding much today, but at least I was rocking my Wolfman shirt.
Bike-urious Alaska

How fitting – I packed the beers into my Wolfman Rolie bags that I was using as tank panniers (again, I’ll write a formal review of these soon), and it was time to grab some dinner.
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We saw this guy scamper by as we pulled up to get some gas.
Bike-urious Alaska

Because Vy loves animals, she took off after it to see what it was.
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Turns out it was this prickly guy.
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And then Bui had to wait in line to pay with his credit card, leaving me alone to laugh at the fact he looks like he’s just standing in a drive-thru line.
Bike-urious Alaska

Saw this bald eagle calling out to something, but we couldn’t figure out why…
Bike-urious Alaska

…until he got chased away by another bald eagle, and we saw that he had a chunk of salmon in his talons!
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Bonus eagle action once we got back into the downtown area for one last evening of exploring.
Bike-urious Alaska

There’s an expensive ($31/person) tram that quickly (2-3 minutes)takes you to the top of Mt. Roberts, where I guess there’s a restaurant and some hiking trails? We didn’t bother.
Bike-urious Alaska

Though we did enjoy watching the tram itself at work.
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Another eagle – I love seeing them in the ‘wild’ so I couldn’t help but take more photos.
Bike-urious Alaska

Turns out it was actually on top of a Taku seafood warehouse. I’m hoping it was the previous bald eagle I saw, coming back for more salmon.
Bike-urious Alaska

As you might expect, there’s a bit of Russian influence in Juneau. We noticed a Russian-themed store and had to check out some matryoshka dolls – I think this one had over 30 in it!
Bike-urious Alaska

Now that’s an outfit for cold weather.
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A random mural near the center where they were having the annual cultural celebration.
Bike-urious Alaska

Continuing with the Russian theme, we got dinner at a place called Pel’meni.
Bike-urious Alaska

It’s very basic and a bit divey, and the food is good – my kind of place.
Bike-urious Alaska

They serve tiny dumplings with either potatoes and meat, and slather it in curry. Highly recommended!
Bike-urious Alaska

As we left dinner, we noticed that a cruise ship, Statendam, which had left an hour previously was still sitting in port. The locals were starting to wonder what was going on – turns out that they’d be there for a total of 5 hours, sorting out a mechanical issue.
Bike-urious Alaska

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Heading back to the dorms in the evening, even if it looks like noon.
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Though it says 2012 on it, these were the wonderful Whale Cards that they give summer housing residents.
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I realize that fluke is part of a whale tail, but why would you give yourself a nickname that usually means something like ‘lucky accident’? I pondered that while heading to bed, and prepping to finally get back on the road the next day.
Bike-urious Alaska

Harley-Davidson MX250 - Featured

Brand New – 1978 Harley-Davidson MX250

7-27 Update: The seller did not get any offers close to his $18,000 asking price the last time around, so this Harley-Davidson MX250 is back up for sale with bidding up to $14,000

In the late 70s, Harley was in a phase of small-displacement bikes while under the control of AMF. They decided to dabble in the world of motocross, and had their Italian branch, Aermacchi, build the Harley-Davidson MX250. It was the first (and only) HD MX bike, and it only lasted for one year. The package was oddly international – an Italian motor with Japanese suspension, ignition, and tires, and Spanish rims. Magazine reviews of the time all spoke highly of the power from the engine, though the general consensus was that the powerband was relatively narrow. HD focused its marketing on racing, and they even had a factory team (starring Rex Staten) that earned a podium spot in a MX National in 1977. Continue reading

KZ650 - Right Side

A Question for Los Angeles readers…

A good friend of mine has a ’70s Kawasaki KZ650 that’s been sitting in his garage for way too long.  He’s about to bring it back to life, and neither him nor I are capable of doing that ourselves. The list of mechanics I trust in the area is pretty much limited to BMW guys, so I’m hoping one of you might have a recommendation for someone solid in West Los Angeles that could bring this KZ650 back to its former glory?

Thanks in advance for anyone that has a referral!

Picture from http://www.kzrider.com/forum/6-paint-a-bodywork/434929-csr-tailpiece-mod?tmpl=component&type=raw

Sunbeam S8 - Right Side

1951 Sunbeam S8

After WWII, as part of reparations, BMW gave up its designs of the BMW R75. Bikes like Chang Jiang and Ural used these designs, but England’s take was the Sunbeam S7. You can see the BMW influence when you look at a side profile, but Sunbeam wanted to differentiate themselves by utilizing a inline vertical twin instead of the German boxer twin. Unfortunately, Sunbeam’s engineering changes, particularly to the driveshaft, chewed through drive components. The bike was left with the double whammy of being expensive and not very reliable, meaning it sold very poorly in the three years it was built (’46-’48). Immediately after, the British firm came out with a revised S7 as well as the Sunbeam S8, a cheaper, simpler model that was also lighter and inherently sportier. Continue reading

BMW R27 - Trailer

1965 BMW R27 with Trailer

The last shaft-driven single that BMW made, the R27 produced 18 horsepower. 15,364 were sold, and who knows how many remain. All I know is that most R27s definitely do not come with this sweet trailer! Unfortunately, the seller seems to be selling two R27s and confused his descriptions, so we get no details on the trailer (and I can’t identify it). Still, it’s unique enough that I thought I’d give you a quick peek. Find this BMW R27 for sale here on Craigslist in Chicago, Illinois for $9,999.

This bike-uriousity brought to you by Zack B!