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1998 Suzuki TL1000R

In Japan, Sport by AbhiLeave a Comment

Produced from 1998-2003, this TL1000R was Suzuki’s V-Twin superbike, the fully-faired (and racier) brother of the TL1000S. This model was briefly used in Suzuki’s World and American Superbike Championship campaigns before they switched to the lighter 750 Gixxer.

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1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC

In Japan, Sport by AbhiLeave a Comment

TCC stood for the Turbo Cycle Corporation, and it was created to sell bolt on turbos for motorcycles built by American Turbo-Pak. The founder of TCC was a former Kawasaki USA employee named Alan Masek, and he used his contacts to help develop the first ‘production’ turbocharged bike. Kawasaki’s Z1R was their top of the line bike but Alan figured …

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2003 Kawasaki ZRX1200R

In Japan, Sport by Mathieu Guyot-SionnestLeave a Comment

Eddie Lawson is a famous American motorcycle road racer that won multiple world championship, including the 500cc AMA Superbike Series in 1981 and 1982 – these two 500cc titles are two of the four he won in the 80’s. Eddie was nicknamed “Steady Eddie” thanks to his capacity to consistently finish races, avoid crashing, and often ending on the podium …

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1990 Honda Transalp XL600V

In Dual-Sport, Japan, Less than 5k by Mathieu Guyot-SionnestLeave a Comment

Following the release of the R80GS by BMW and the birth of one of the greatest races of all time (the Paris Dakar), manufacturers started to add a new kind of bike to their product range. These new “adventure” bikes were road legal adaptations of off road racing motorcycles used primarily for the P-D. During the 80’s, Honda won the …

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2006 Honda Big Ruckus PS250

In Japan, Scooter by AbhiLeave a Comment

The Ruckus was a surprising hit for Honda, due almost entirely to the aftermarket customization that has skyrocketed around the 50cc scooter. What many people don’t know is that Honda offered a ‘full-size’ version called the Honda Big Ruckus for 4 years in Japan and 2 years (2005-2006) in the US/Canada.

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1984 Honda Nighthawk 700SC

In Japan, Standard by Mathieu Guyot-SionnestLeave a Comment

The 80’s were a fascinating decade for motorcycles, and I appreciate the products of that era nowadays as they are basically classic bikes with newer designs. Or recent bikes with older design, depending on how you see it! In the US, lots of these 80’s bikes were considered “muscle bikes” like the Yamaha Radian, the Honda Shadow, the Kawasaki GPZ, …

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Wacky Kwacky – 1995 Kawasaki KLR250

In Dual-Sport, Japan, Less than 5k by Tim HuberLeave a Comment

In 1984, Kawasaki debuted a pair of new dual-sport models that quickly proved to be major hits with the motorcycling world. The larger of the models was the KLR600, which was bumped up to 650ccs, where it remains to this day as one of Kawa’s best-selling models, and (as of 2015) the best-selling dual-sport period. The smaller of the two …

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1982 Honda CBX1000

In Japan, Touring by Mathieu Guyot-SionnestLeave a Comment

Having more than 4 cylinders on a bike is not just a recent pursuit for manufacturers. Aviation was the principal influence in doing multi-cylinder motors, using radial engines like “La Millet” in 1887, a French motorcycle made with a 5-cylinder radial engine located in the back wheel. Obviously, this “more than 4 cylinders” path was not the easiest to follow …

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One Owner -1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

In Japan, Sport by AbhiLeave a Comment

Depending on how you define “production”, Kawasaki was the first motorcycle manufacturer to roll out a turbocharged motorcycle. But as this excellent article on OddBike points out, Kawasaki’s effort was more of a quasi-aftermarket creation, and it wasn’t well-thought out either. Honda’s CX500 Turbo is more deserving of the ‘first production turbo bike’ title, as it truly started the forced …

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Kitted Cub – 1966 Honda C100 with Roadster Kit

In Japan, Less than 5k, Small Displacement by Tim HuberLeave a Comment

While Honda found success with its small step-through models in most markets, the Japanese marque struggled to sell scooters in the same numbers in the US. Honda looked to change this with the introduction of what it called the “Custom Group”, consisting of four different add-on kits (the Roadster, Rally, Boss, and Student) designed to make little runners like the …